Seattle, King County, Washington, USA



 

Notizen: Wikipedia 2015:
Seattle is a West Coast seaport city and the seat of King County. With an estimated 668,342 residents as of 2014, Seattle is the largest city in both the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest region of North America, and, as of July 2013, is the fastest-growing major city in the United States. The Seattle metropolitan area of around 3.6 million inhabitants is the 15th largest metropolitan area in the United States. The city is situated on a narrow isthmus between Puget Sound (an inlet of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about 100 miles (160 km) south of the Canada–United States border. A major gateway for trade with Asia, Seattle is the 8th largest port in the United States and 9th largest in North America in terms of container handling.
The Seattle area was previously inhabited by Native Americans for at least 4,000 years before the first permanent European settlers. Arthur A. Denny and his group of travelers, subsequently known as the Denny Party, arrived from Illinois via Portland, Oregon on the schooner Exact at Alki Point on November 13, 1851. The settlement was moved to the eastern shore of Elliott Bay and named "Seattle" in 1852, after Chief Si'ahl of the local Duwamish and Suquamish tribes.
Logging was Seattle's first major industry, but by the late 19th century the city had become a commercial and shipbuilding center as a gateway to Alaska during the Klondike Gold Rush. By 1910, Seattle was one of the 25 largest cities in the country. However, the Great Depression severely damaged the city's economy. Growth returned during and after World War II, due partially to the local Boeing company, which established Seattle as a center for aircraft manufacturing. The Seattle area developed as a technology center beginning in the 1980s, with companies like Microsoft becoming established in the region. In 1994 the Internet retail giant Amazon was founded in Seattle. The stream of new software, biotechnology, and Internet companies led to an economic revival, which increased the city's population by almost 50,000 between 1990 and 2000.
Seattle has a noteworthy musical history. From 1918 to 1951, there were nearly two dozen jazz nightclubs along Jackson Street, from the current Chinatown/International District, to the Central District. The jazz scene developed the early careers of Ray Charles, Quincy Jones, Ernestine Anderson and others. Seattle is also the birthplace of rock musician Jimi Hendrix and the alternative rock style grunge.
History:
Archaeological excavations suggest that Native Americans have inhabited the Seattle area for at least 4,000 years. By the time the first European settlers arrived, the people (subsequently called the Duwamish tribe) occupied at least seventeen villages in the areas around Elliott Bay.
The first European to visit the Seattle area was George Vancouver, in May 1792 during his 1791–95 expedition to chart the Pacific Northwest.
In 1851, a large party led by Luther Collins made a location on land at the mouth of the Duwamish River; they formally claimed it on September 14, 1851. Thirteen days later, members of the Collins Party on the way to their claim passed three scouts of the Denny Party. Members of the Denny Party claimed land on Alki Point on September 28, 1851. The rest of the Denny Party set sail from Portland, Oregon and landed on Alki point during a rainstorm on November 13, 1851.
After a difficult winter, most of the Denny Party relocated across Elliott Bay and claimed land a second time at the site of present-day Pioneer Square. Charles Terry and John Low remained at the original landing location and reestablished their old land claim and called it "New York", but renamed "New York Alki" in April 1853, from a Chinook word meaning, roughly, "by and by" or "someday". For the next few years, New York Alki and Duwamps competed for dominance, but in time Alki was abandoned and its residents moved across the bay to join the rest of the settlers.
David Swinson "Doc" Maynard, one of the founders of Duwamps, was the primary advocate to name the settlement after Chief Sealth ("Seattle") of the Duwamish and Suquamish tribes.
The name "Seattle" appears on official Washington Territory papers dated May 23, 1853, when the first plats for the village were filed. In 1855, nominal land settlements were established. On January 14, 1865, the Legislature of Territorial Washington incorporated the Town of Seattle with a board of trustees managing the city. The town of Seattle remained a mere precinct of King County until late 1869, when a new petition was filed and the city was re-incorporated with a Mayor-council government. The corporate seal of the City of Seattle carries the date "1869" and a likeness of Chief Sealth in left profile.
Seattle has a history of boom-and-bust cycles, like many other cities near areas of extensive natural and mineral resources. Seattle has risen several times economically, then gone into precipitous decline, but it has typically used those periods to rebuild solid infrastructure.
The first such boom, covering the early years of the city, rode on the lumber industry. (During this period the road now known as Yesler Way won the nickname "Skid Road", supposedly after the timber skidding down the hill to Henry Yesler's sawmill. The later dereliction of the area may be a possible origin for the term which later entered the wider American lexicon as Skid Row.) Like much of the American West, Seattle saw numerous conflicts between labor and management, as well as ethnic tensions that culminated in the anti-Chinese riots of 1885–1886. This violence originated with unemployed whites who were determined to drive the Chinese from Seattle (anti-Chinese riots also occurred in Tacoma). In 1900, Asians were 4.2% of the population. Authorities declared martial law and federal troops arrived to put down the disorder. Nevertheless, the economic success in the Seattle area was so great that when the Great Seattle fire of 1889 destroyed the central business district, a far grander city-center rapidly emerged in its place. Finance company Washington Mutual, for example, was founded in the immediate wake of the fire. This boom was followed by the construction of a park system, designed by the Olmsted brothers' landscape architecture firm. However, the Panic of 1893 hit Seattle hard.
The second and most dramatic boom and bust resulted from the Klondike Gold Rush, which ended the depression that had begun with the Panic of 1893; in a short time, Seattle became a major transportation center. On July 14, 1897, the S.S. Portland docked with its famed "ton of gold", and Seattle became the main transport and supply point for the miners in Alaska and the Yukon. Few of those working men found lasting wealth, however; it was Seattle's business of clothing the miners and feeding them salmon that panned out in the long run. Along with Seattle, other cities like Everett, Tacoma, Port Townsend, Bremerton, and Olympia, all in the Puget Sound region, became competitors for exchange, rather than mother lodes for extraction, of precious metals. The boom lasted well into the early part of the 20th century and funded many new Seattle companies and products. In 1907, 19-year-old James E. Casey borrowed $100 from a friend and founded the American Messenger Company (later UPS). Other Seattle companies founded during this period include Nordstrom and Eddie Bauer.
The Gold Rush era culminated in the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition of 1909, which is largely responsible for the layout of today's University of Washington campus.
A shipbuilding boom in the early part of the 20th century became massive during World War I, making Seattle somewhat of a company town; the subsequent retrenchment led to the Seattle General Strike of 1919, the first general strike in the country. A 1912 city development plan by Virgil Bogue went largely unused. Seattle was mildly prosperous in the 1920s but was particularly hard hit in the Great Depression, experiencing some of the country's harshest labor strife in that era. Violence during the Maritime Strike of 1934 cost Seattle much of its maritime traffic, which was rerouted to the Port of Los Angeles.
Seattle was also the home base of impresario Alexander Pantages who, starting in 1902, opened a number of theaters in the city exhibiting vaudeville acts and silent movies. His activities soon expanded, and the thrifty Greek went on and became one of America's greatest theater and movie tycoons. Between Pantages and his rival John Considine, Seattle was for a while the western United States' vaudeville mecca. B. Marcus Priteca, the Scottish-born and Seattle-based architect, built several theaters for Pantages, including some in Seattle. The theaters he built for Pantages in Seattle have been either demolished or converted to other uses, but many other theaters survive in other cities of the U.S., often retaining the Pantages name; Seattle's surviving Paramount Theatre, on which he collaborated, was not a Pantages theater.
War work again brought local prosperity during World War II, this time centered on Boeing aircraft. The war dispersed the city's numerous Japanese-American businessmen due to the Japanese American internment. After the war, the local economy dipped. It rose again with Boeing's growing dominance in the commercial airliner market. Seattle celebrated its restored prosperity and made a bid for world recognition with the Century 21 Exposition, the 1962 World's Fair. Another major local economic downturn was in the late 1960s and early 1970s, at a time when Boeing was heavily affected by the oil crises, loss of Government contracts, and costs and delays associated with the Boeing 747. Many people left the area to look for work elsewhere, and two local real estate agents put up a billboard reading "Will the last person leaving Seattle – Turn out the lights."
Seattle remained the corporate headquarters of Boeing until 2001, when the company separated its headquarters from its major production facilities; the headquarters were moved to Chicago. The Seattle area is still home to Boeing's Renton narrow-body plant (where the 707, 720, 727, and 757 were assembled, and the 737 is assembled today) and Everett wide-body plant (assembly plant for the 747, 767, 777, and 787). The company's credit union for employees, BECU, remains based in the Seattle area, though it is now open to all residents of Washington.
As prosperity began to return in the 1980s, the city was stunned by the Wah Mee massacre in 1983, when 13 people were killed in an illegal gambling club in the International District, Seattle's Chinatown. Beginning with Microsoft's 1979 move from Albuquerque, New Mexico to nearby Bellevue, Washington, Seattle and its suburbs became home to a number of technology companies including Amazon.com, RealNetworks, Nintendo of America, McCaw Cellular (now part of AT&T Mobility), VoiceStream (now T-Mobile), and biomedical corporations such as HeartStream (later purchased by Philips), Heart Technologies (later purchased by Boston Scientific), Physio-Control (later purchased by Medtronic), ZymoGenetics, ICOS (later purchased by Eli Lilly and Company) and Immunex (later purchased by Amgen). This success brought an influx of new residents with a population increase within city limits of almost 50,000 between 1990 and 2000, and saw Seattle's real estate become some of the most expensive in the country. In 1993, the movie Sleepless in Seattle brought the city further national attention. Many of the Seattle area's tech companies remained relatively strong, but the frenzied dot-com boom years ended in early 2001.
Seattle in this period attracted widespread attention as home to these many companies, but also by hosting the 1990 Goodwill Games and the APEC leaders conference in 1993, as well as through the worldwide popularity of grunge, a sound that had developed in Seattle's independent music scene. Another bid for worldwide attention—hosting the World Trade Organization Ministerial Conference of 1999—garnered visibility, but not in the way its sponsors desired, as related protest activity and police reactions to those protests overshadowed the conference itself. The city was further shaken by the Mardi Gras Riots in 2001, and then literally shaken the following day by the Nisqually earthquake.

Geographische Breite: 47.6062095, Geographische Länge: -122.3320708


Geburt

Treffer 1 bis 37 von 37

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Geburt    Personen-Kennung 
1 Beierle, Coila Elizabeth  15 Jul 1952Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I94984
2 Brown, Marcus  7 Jul 1931Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10993
3 Deibert, Alan  19 Apr 1966Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I171219
4 Deibert, Timothy Lee  18 Aug 1960Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I171217
5 Hanson, Marion Lucille  17 Nov 1932Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10509
6 Helmer, Clyde S.  19 Mrz 1947Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I92155
7 Hesse, Elsie Pearl  10 Mrz 1918Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10418
8 Hesse, Kyle William  3 Mai 1920Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10481
9 Higman, Genevieve Mae  16 Aug 1911Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I12368
10 Horman, Ellen Anita  13 Dez 1921Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10574
11 Horman, Lucille Alvena  10 Jun 1920Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10573
12 Horman, Roy Joseph  29 Okt 1927Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10576
13 Horman, Ruby Leona  6 Jul 1924Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10611
14 Horman, Ted Vowles  15 Dez 1933Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10558
15 Howick, Gerald Boyd  8 Feb 1934Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10504
16 Howick, Howard Leonard  11 Dez 1931Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10503
17 Howick, Oswald Magner  31 Jan 1903Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10501
18 Howick, Sidney Owen  6 Okt 1927Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10502
19 Kemmerer, Marcia Ann  25 Mrz 1953Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I88222
20 Murphy, Delbert Willis  30 Dez 1933Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10519
21 Murphy, Floyd Melvin  9 Dez 1935Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10520
22 Murphy, Greg Floyd  17 Sep 1957Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10522
23 Payzant, Virginia Grace  1 Jul 1923Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I148611
24 Repper, Mildred Mary  29 Feb 1920Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I11031
25 Scheerer, Nancy Carolyn  28 Nov 1959Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I157814
26 Scribner, Jack Mahlon  28 Okt 1927Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I76985
27 Stadlman, Joanna Katherine  23 Mai 1938Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10988
28 Tuttle, Jay Forrester  17 Nov 1913Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I127888
29 Webster, Allen  Okt 1912Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I11020
30 Webster, Audrey Allen  6 Nov 1930Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I11025
31 Webster, Doris G.  2 Jul 1932Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10986
32 Webster, James Edward  21 Dez 1934Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10987
33 Webster, Shirley  24 Dez 1928Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10982
34 Webster, Valerie Mae  28 Aug 1924Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I11024
35 Wiest, Matthew Paul +  22 Sep 1986Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I52402
36 Wilkins, Patricia  20 Mai 1924Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10427
37 Woody, Ernest E.  28 Feb 1910Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I3510

Getauft

Treffer 1 bis 2 von 2

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Getauft    Personen-Kennung 
1 Fischer, Delores May  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I42410
2 Fischer, Ferry Fairmond  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I42411

Gestorben

Treffer 1 bis 50 von 90

1 2 Vorwärts»

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Gestorben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Ahrendt, Lydia  24 Dez 1939Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I88115
2 Bailey, Florence  1936Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I11016
3 Beierle, Roy Frederick  12 Jan 1986Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I94980
4 Bloechinger, Alvena Mary  5 Jun 1930Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10562
5 Brandt, Emil  Datum unbekanntSeattle, King County, Washington, USA I171021
6 Brandt, John  Datum unbekanntSeattle, King County, Washington, USA I171016
7 Braun, Juliana  Feb 1954Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I20591
8 Brokofsky, Lydia  Mrz 1976Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I87233
9 Bujer, Walter C.  19 Okt 1945Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I136164
10 Bush, John Shakespeare  5 Feb 1939Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I47647
11 Cave, Elmer L.  3 Nov 1946Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I27784
12 Crellin, James  14 Apr 1982Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I156468
13 Cresswell, Don  20 Aug 1968Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I110503
14 Deibert, Alan  20 Apr 1966Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I171219
15 Deibert, Timothy Lee  19 Aug 1995Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I171217
16 Dennison, Joyce Laura Bowen  1 Jan 1976Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10556
17 Eberhart, George  20 Dez 1937Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I106247
18 Ebert, Adolph Heinrich  21 Aug 1952Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10419
19 Ebert, Howard John  6 Feb 1983Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10423
20 Ely, Harold Clayton  Mai 1972Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I24014
21 Fliehman, Henry  Mrz 1966Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I158864
22 Giersdorf, Robert  5 Feb 2003Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I91944
23 Giese, Arthur Emanuel  28 Jul 1972Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I159263
24 Giese, Edward  Jun 1963Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I159423
25 Giese, Ted  14 Mai 1993Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I159414
26 Gordon, Aura May  27 Jul 1977Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I7077
27 Gramm, Hilda Wilma  3 Mai 1978Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I119548
28 Green, Francis  9 Aug 1955Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I110673
29 Harris, Irene  Sep 1972Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I85917
30 Heinle, Lorraine  7 Dez 2002Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I91943
31 Hempel, Raymond Harold  17 Mai 1956Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I127880
32 Hesse, William Friedrich  30 Jan 1958Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10436
33 Hofer, Alvin D.  26 Dez 1994Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I8086
34 Horman, Ellen Anita  8 Apr 1966Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10574
35 Horman, Ernest Vowles  1 Jun 1972Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10498
36 Horman, George De La Haye  20 Mrz 1917Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10492
37 Horman, Herbert Vowles  5 Mai 1981Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10497
38 Horman, Roy Joseph  31 Okt 1927Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I10576
39 Horning, John J.  Jan 1972Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I100136
40 Jenner, Wilhelm  Jan 1993Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I89438
41 Kallenberger, Elaine Stella  26 Jan 1973Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I8085
42 Kast, Julius P.  20 Dez 1969Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I156728
43 Keithahn, Monte Serr  5 Mrz 1928Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I88128
44 Kerkendall, Homer S.  23 Jan 1989Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I39948
45 Kirby, Robert Zebulon  DECEASEDSeattle, King County, Washington, USA I23935
46 Klimpel, Frank Rudolph  28 Jun 1953Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I16725
47 Kronwald, Elizabeth  29 Dez 1991Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I159058
48 Laabs, Eugene Darrel  26 Aug 1982Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I158249
49 Landgren, Dr. Clarence Adelbert  17 Aug 1973Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I115395
50 Lobe, Emil M.  15 Mai 1994Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I76630

1 2 Vorwärts»



Begraben

Treffer 1 bis 13 von 13

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Begraben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Ahrendt, Lydia  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I88115
2 Eberhart, Cora L. - wife of  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I106248
3 Eberhart, George  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I106247
4 Fischer, Delores May  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I42410
5 Keithahn, Monte Serr  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I88128
6 Klimpel, Frank Rudolph  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I16725
7 Liebelt, Juliana  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I161160
8 Peterson, Hulda Josephine  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I106581
9 Prather, Roscona Celia  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I107170
10 Schaible, Eleonora Ida  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I97769
11 Serr, Johann Michael  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I88114
12 Turner, William Donovan  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I107167
13 Zimbelmann, Sophia Luella  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I2266

Alias-Name

Treffer 1 bis 1 von 1

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Alias-Name    Personen-Kennung 
1 LaFave, Dennis Dwight  Seattle, King County, Washington, USA I3599

Verheiratet

Treffer 1 bis 38 von 38

   Familie    Verheiratet    Familien-Kennung 
1 Avery / Wagner  21 Dez 1986Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F2549
2 Bauer / Higman  10 Okt 1939Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F4402
3 Begeman / Goehring  geschätzt 1943Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F20920
4 Burkle / Rudolph  14 Okt 1945Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F38309
5 Crellin / Opp  6 Sep 1963Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F51423
6 Deibert / Goodale  14 Jun 1954Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F56630
7 Dumont / Prachinski  31 Mai 1927Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F18070
8 Ebert / Hesse  8 Mrz 1938Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3684
9 Ebert / Repper  29 Aug 1942Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3924
10 Ebert / Wilkins  5 Jul 1947Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3687
11 Fischer / Bevins  30 Mai 1946Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F14257
12 Hempel / Rompel  3 Apr 1921Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F41890
13 Hepper / Eitreim  20 Feb 1943Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F14411
14 Hesse / Horman  2 Jun 1917Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3691
15 Hesse / Mathews  31 Jan 1947Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3708
16 Hoen / Grenz  Okt 1964Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F38146
17 Holscher / Larshus  11 Sep 1945Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F52869
18 Horman / Bloechinger  23 Feb 1918Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3733
19 Horman / Mckenzie  30 Okt 1943Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3778
20 Horman / Peters  2 Jun 1917Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3751
21 Horman / Todd  17 Aug 1921Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3724
22 Howick / Hanson  20 Jul 1952Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3714
23 Howick / Hedwall  9 Jun 1951Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3715
24 Howick / Horman  3 Aug 1925Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3712
25 Jensen / Webster  1956Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3922
26 Mills / Giese  10 Jul 1930Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F6913
27 Murphy / Horman  4 Dez 1920Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3717
28 Nazarenus / Barcott  7 Aug 1959Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F29759
29 Perry / Cooksey  5 Apr 1942Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F29145
30 Placek / Wagner  10 Jun 1940Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F2544
31 Reichle / Horman  20 Sep 1940Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3743
32 Robinson / Webster  1942Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3921
33 Sandau / Swenson  8 Jan 1947Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F47255
34 Scheerer / Buck  1 Okt 1955Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F51916
35 Schoch / Mylius  28 Jun 1924Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F10973
36 Wagner / Hoffman  30 Mrz 1940Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F2551
37 Webster / Webster  4 Jun 1932Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F3917
38 Zimmerman / Nicklaus  16 Nov 1949Seattle, King County, Washington, USA F35868